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Are you a spiritual seeker?

Have you ever wanted to deepen your relationship within yourself, others, and with the cosmos? Have you wondered about the nature of God or where we came from or where we’re going? As your Spiritual Companion I will hold space for you to explore these questions and listen carefully to where you are most at peace on earth.

Spiritual fulfillment is an individual path, but you don’t have to walk it alone. I have been helping people explore that path since 1993. Please contact me for an introductory session to find out how spiritual direction can enhance your personal efforts. At the end of each session I will ask if you want to schedule another, so you don’t have to worry about making a commitment then changing your mind.

What is Spiritual Direction?

Spiritual Direction is an ancient contemplative  tradition of spiritual companionship and guidance. It has been carried on around the world continuously by thoughtful people from many religious traditions, from no religious background, and even by atheists. Spiritual life is a way of feeling grounded and connected to all that is sacred and whole.

 

About

My spiritual practice has shifted over time. Morning walks have sharpened my senses to the sights and sounds of nature, the faces of neighbors (and their dogs), and the sacred beauty of creation. Meditation has served to quiet my mind, calm my spirit, and hear the still, small voice in my heart. A gratitude journal highlights the joy of each day and the blessings in my life. Simplicity and intention are key elements. My practice has to fit nicely into my life!

Since my ordination as a Unitarian Universalist pastor in 1993, I have served congregations in Texas, and consulted out of state. I have found that conversations with individuals and small groups about matters of the heart is the most deeply personal and fulfilling part of my vocation.

What I Do

For individuals and small groups, I hold a comfortable space to contemplate the sacred in everyday life. Whether you have had moments of “wow!” or a more gradual unfolding of your spiritual life, it is helpful to spend some intentional time in reflection.

One-on-one sessions, whether in person or online (e.g. Skype or Zoom), provide ultimate privacy and space to speak about whatever is in your heart. Monthly one-hour sessions are typical, with daytime and evening slots available. That leaves plenty of time in between to explore new spiritual practices or perhaps ways to integrate mind, body, and spirit.

Spirituality groups may be in person or on Zoom. Depending on the group, there might be a series on a topic such as prayer, inspirational poetry, guided meditation, grief and loss, or remembering one’s religious upbringing and how one’s beliefs have evolved since childhood.

Individuals usually meet with me on a monthly basis. Groups are arranged in various formats. Donations are optional.

Blog

Resources

Spiritual Directors International

Austin Area Spiritual Directors

Krista Tippett’s On Being :     “The On Being Project is an independent non-profit public life and media initiative. We pursue deep thinking and social courage, moral imagination and joy, to renew inner life, outer life, and life together.”

Everyday Spiritual Practice: Simple Pathways for Enriching Your Life, Ed. Scott Alexander . . . . . Dozens of essays from people who have found a wide variety of ways to be spiritual each day. (It’s not always about meditation!)

To Bless the Space Between Us: A Book of Blessings, by John O’Donohue . . . . . In times of transition, leadership, beginnings, beyond endings, and more, O’Donohue has taught us how to “bless, heal, and renew one another.”

Peace Is Every Step,  by Thich Nhat Hahn . . . . . Spiritual leader, Zen master, inspired teacher, Thich Nhat Hahn incorporates ringing telephones, traffic lights, and simple smiles to bring him back to the present moment.

An Altar in the World, by Barbara Brown Taylor . . . . . After her reflection on Leaving Church as an Episcopal priest, Taylor finds the sacred in the world of nature. Slow down, pay attention, and stand in awe of this world.

Learning to Walk in the Dark, by Barbara Brown Taylor . . . . . Taylor finds God in the nighttime, not just in the light of day. She encourages us to let go of fears and anxieties in favor of courage and hope even in the dark times.

When Things Fall Apart: Heart Advice for Difficult Times, by Pema Chödrön . . . . . Life can be terribly challenging, and getting through these difficulties may result in hard-earned personal and spiritual growth. The author writes a new afterward in the 20th anniversary edition of this well-loved classic. She is an American Buddhist nun.

Kitchen Table Wisdom: Stories that Heal, 10th Anniversary Edition, by Rachel Naomi Remen . . . . . Her experience as a physician, a professor of medicine, a therapist, and a long-time survivor of chronic illness led her to collect true stories of living, loving, and healing. (Remen also wrote My Grandfather’s Blessings.)